Tuesday, August 26, 2014

FW 2.1b --discarded theories--

2.1a: Now (to forebare for ever solittle of Iris Frees and Lili O'Rangans)...
2.1b: which would link him back with such pivotal ancestors as the Glues...
2.1c: We are told how in the beginning it came to pass that, like cabbaging...
2.1d: Forgetful of all save his vassal's plain fealty to the ethnarch, Humphrey...
2.1e: On his majesty, who was, or often feigned to be, noticeably longsighted...
2.1f: Our sailor king, who was draining a gugglet of obvious adamale...
2.1g: turned towards two of his retinue of gallowglasses, Michael, etheling lord...
2.1h: (in either case a triptychal religious family symbolising puritas of doctrina...
2.1i: For he kinned Jom Pill with his court so gray and his haunts in his house...


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FDV: "the most authentic version has it that" →
"which would link him either with the Glues & Gravys & Earwickers of Sidleham {in the hundred of manhood} or proclaim him a descendant of vikings who had settled in Herwick (?) or Erwick (?) the most authentic version has it that it was this way." →
4DV: "which would link him back with such pivotal ancestors as the Glues, the Gravys, the Northeasts, the Ankers and the Earwickers of Sidlesham in the hundred of manhood or proclaim him a descendant of vikings who had founded or settled in Herrick or Eric the best authenticated version has it that it was this way."




which would link him back with such pivotal ancestors

link/pivot = mechanism motif?

"with" not 'to'?

VI.B3.92: 'pivotal ancestor'
Fitzpatrick: Ireland and the Making of Britain 141: 'Cormac, the descendent of Lethain. He was of the line of Olliol Olum, King of Munster and pivotal ancestor of its nobility'


as the Glues, the Gravys, the Northeasts, the Ankers

A Pictorial & Descriptive Guide to Bognor &c. Chichester 54: 'Sidlesham Church is an Early English structure worthy of notice, and an examination of the surrounding tombstones should not be omitted if any interest is felt in deciphering curious names, striking examples being Earwicker, Glue, Gravy, Boniface, Anker, and Northeast' (Sidlesham is in the Hundred of Manhood, the extreme southwestern Hundred (county division) of Sussex; Joyce stayed in Bognor, a few miles from there, in summer 1923)

(cf sending old horse 'to glue factory'?)


and the Earwickers of Sidlesham in the Hundred of Manhood

German erwecken: to rouse, to raise from the dead

A Pictorial & Descriptive Guide to Bognor &c. Chichester 54: 'From Chichester to Selsey Hill runs a light railway called the Hundred of Manhood and Selsey Tramway'


or proclaim him offsprout of vikings who had founded wapentake

offspring
offshoot

Joyce doesn't normally capitalise 'viking'

'Wapentake' of some English counties corresponds to 'Hundred' of others


and seddled hem in Herrick or Eric,

settled
Siddlesham (misspelling of Sidlesham??)

archaic hem: them
Dutch hem: him

longshot: Herrick: the maiden name of Swift's mother (F. Elrington Ball: The Correspondence of Jonathan Swift, D.D., vol. I, 37 (1910): 'the name is spelt variously Herrick and Erick') cf fw55 "that once grand old elrington bawl"

the old 'correct' pronunciation of the name Earwicker is 'Erricker'


the best authenticated version, the Dumlat,

Talmud (backwards: fweet-44): Hebrew commentary on the Pentateuch (Hebrew is written from right to left)


read the Reading of Hofed-ben-Edar, has it that it was this way.

Dutch hoofd: head

(a parody of a rabbi's name)

Hebrew ben: son of

Irish Binn √Čadair: Howth Head

VI.B10.96: 'it's this way'






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